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From Madrid to New York City: Spanish Protester Joins Occupy Wall Street Protest

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The Occupy Wall Street protests have inspired activists across the United States and overseas, but many see the roots of the occupation in the public squares of Cairo, Athens and Madrid. On Monday, we spoke to one Spanish protester who traveled from Madrid to New York City to support the budding movement. “I came here just for this, because we started our movement four months ago, on 15 of May,” Monica Lopez said. “I decided to come to support you and to try to help you, like giving you the advices so you don’t waste the time we lost and make the same mistakes.” [includes rush transcript]

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Transcript
This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

MONICA LOPEZ: I’m Monica Lopez. I am 25 years old, and I’m a journalist and photographer. And I’m from Spain. And I came here just for this, because we started our movement four months ago, on 15 of May. So I decided to come to support you and to try to help you, like giving you the advices so you don’t waste the time we lost and make the same mistakes.

AMY GOODMAN: And the movement there in Spain, explain what it is, who the Indignados were.

MONICA LOPEZ: Yeah, well, a lot of people don’t like that word, because the media got that word for us. When we called Indignados like at the beginning, but we are not just Indignados.

AMY GOODMAN: The angry, indignant.

MONICA LOPEZ: Yeah, but it’s not—we are more than indignated, you know? We are like, “This is enough. We have to change things right now.”

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Wall Street Trader Praises Occupy Wall Street: “This is a Real Democracy”

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