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War & Climate Change: Jeremy Corbyn on the Brutal Quest for Oil & the Need for a Sustainable Planet

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On Monday in Paris, British Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn addressed the link between labor, trade unions and climate change. We also spoke to him about the connections between war, drilling for oil, and climate. “To some extent, the rush to develop frontier oil resources has reduced, but I’m sure it’s going to come back,” says Corbyn. “And you look at the brutality of it, the brutality of the way in which oil drilling has been done in a number of countries, in Latin America, the thirst for oil all over the Middle East and the thirst for oil in other places. We need a sustainable planet. We need a sustainable future. We need sustainable energy sources. They don’t have to be like that.”

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This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: Why are you here in Paris?

JEREMY CORBYN: I’m here to attend the climate change conference, which I was at this morning, and that was extremely interesting. I’ve had meetings with a number of people all day today here in Paris. I’ve been to the—one of the bars, as I said earlier, that was attacked in that awful evening. And I’m here this evening for a very big event we’ve had with Naomi Klein. We’re talking about environmental politics and a sustainable future for the world. And we’re saying, “Don’t be afraid of the future. Embrace the future for all of us by challenging global warming, by challenging environmental destruction, by challenging global inequality.”

AMY GOODMAN: I know you have to leave, but the connection between war, between drilling for oil, and climate.

JEREMY CORBYN: Well, if you look at the countries where there is a great rush for oil, OK, at the moment oil prices are well down, but that’s a fairly recent phenomenon. That’s over the past year or two years, they’ve gone down a great deal. And to some extent, the rush to develop frontier oil resources has reduced, but I’m sure it’s going to come back. And you look at the brutality of it, the brutality of the way in which oil drilling has been done in a number of countries, in Latin America, the thirst for oil all over the Middle East and the thirst for oil in other places. We need a sustainable planet. We need a sustainable future. We need sustainable energy sources. They don’t have to be like that. There’s a great deal that can be achieved from using good technology to use less energy and develop it in a sustainable way.

AMY GOODMAN: Jeremy Corbyn, I want to thank you for being with us.

AMY GOODMAN: British opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn in his first U.S. television interview since being elected leader of Britain’s Labour Party in September, speaking to us here in Paris, France, after a large Labour gathering. This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. When we come back, one of the world’s leading climate scientists. Stay with us.

[break]

AMY GOODMAN: Ta’Kaiya Blaney, a 14-year-old from the Tla’Amin First Nation in Canada, singing her song, “Turn the World Around,” at the International Rights of Nature Tribunal here in Paris this weekend.

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